Stile der Stadt, Ein Projekt von Filomeno Fusco und Dirck Möllmann

deutsch

Videopanel 2011

February 19 – 27, 2011

Altonaer Museum, Hamburg

House

Stephan Mörsch

Stephan Mörsch *1974 in Aachen
lives and works in Berlin

Exhibitions (selected) (S – Solo; G – Group)
2010 Landnahme, Marta Herford (S)
2009 The Forgotten Bar Project, Galerie im Regierungsviertel, Berlin (G)
2007 Transfer Türkei - NRW, Ludwig Forum, Aachen; Museum Bochum; Ausstellungshalle für moderne Kunst, Münster; Santral Istanbul, Türkei (G)
2005 Modellräume - Bühnen, Spielfelder, Versuchsanordnungen, Städtische Galerie Nordhorn (G)

Awards and Fellowships (selected)
2009 Werkstattförderung Hauptstadtkulturfonds, Berlin
2006/07 Reisestipendium Transfer Türkei - NRW
2006 Hamburger Arbeitsstipendium für bildende Kunst
2003/04 Karl H. Ditze Diplom Sonderpreis

Ärmelkanal / Nordfrankreich

Strandhütte, Ärmelkanal / Nordfrankreich, 2004
Styrofoam, smoothing cement, wood, paint, video camera, cctv-monitor
50 x 85 x 54 cm

Strandbar, Ärmelkanal / Nordfrankreich, 2004
Styrofoam, smoothing cement, wood, paint, video camera, cctv-monitor

Bunker, Ärmelkanal / Nordfrankreich, 2004
Styrofoam, smoothing cement, wood, paint, video camera, cctv-monitor
51 x 50 x 93 cm

Diverse Zeichnungen / Various Drawings Grafit auf Papier, je 21 x 29,5 cm / Graphite on paper, 21 x 29,5 cm each Stephan Mörsch’s models are detailed reconstructions of works of architecture, in a scale of 1:10. His graphite drawings, which resemble graphic novels in their blurred precision and intensity, seem to represent a discontinuous approach to the real buildings and their surroundings. The models of the beach hut, the beach bar, and the bunker – a type of observation bunker – show us buildings with a distinct style. Their creation and function make them a special, protected part of recent history. After the war, the bunkers were used as foundations for beach huts. The latter became symbols for the tourism that was developing again in the postwar period. One cannot see inside the models, but video cameras are installed on the inside. Outside, there are monitors connected to the cameras. Mörsch creates a situation that exhibits video’s features: the simultaneous recording and playback, and the spatial separation of the recording- and playback device. In this closed circuit situation, the viewer is a constitutive part of the artwork, similar to Bruce Naumann’s surveillance systems from the 1970s. She takes a look into a room that is inaccessible to her. This reversal of a bunker situation, where the observed objects becomes the observing subject, presents the curious, searching gaze of the viewer as an almost violent act of crossing borders.