Stile der Stadt, Ein Projekt von Filomeno Fusco und Dirck Möllmann

deutsch

Videopanel 2011

February 19 – 27, 2011

Altonaer Museum, Hamburg

House

Harry Sachs/Franz Hoefner

Franz Hoefner *1970 in Starnberg / Harry Sachs *1974 in Stuttgart
cooperation since 1996, live and work in Berlin

www.skulpturenpark.org

Ausstellungen und Projekte (Auswahl)
2010 Land’s End, mit KUNSTrePUBLIK e.V., Berlin
2009 Fontaine, in the context of Nuit Blanche, Metz, Frankreich
2008 Forum Arcaden, Kunstverein Gera
seit 2006    Skulpturenpark Berlin Zentrum – KUNSTrePUBLIK e.V., gegründet von Harry Sachs, Philipp Horst, Daniel Seiple, Matthias Einhoff
2002 Mehrzweckhalle, Baumaßnahmen in der Hafencity Hamburg

Preise und Stipendien (Auswahl)
2008 Stiftung Kunstfonds, Bonn
2006 Projektförderung Berliner Senat (Projekt Honey Neustadt)
2003 RADAR Stipendium in Kooperation mit La Biennale di Venezia, 2003
2002 Hamburgische Kulturstiftung, Kulturbehörde Hamburg, Freundeskreis der HfBK (Projekt Mehrzweckhalle)

Robinsonade

Mixed media, HD Video on DVD, 16:9, colour, sound, ca. 15 min.

Material changes. It develops its own language and thus whispers to the things it forms, to the walls it designs, to the people inhabiting it. Franz Hoefner and Harry Sachs arrange material from a Berlin flat to build a raft that cannot be entered. Under closer inspection, the installation begins to talk about stuff that is maybe as reliable as old, worn peasant shoes, and has definitely been in use for a long time – thus carrying a small story of devotedness and resistance in it. For decades, an old man used to live in Invalidenstraße 1, formerly East Berlin, then Whole Berlin. Finally, as the last remaining tenant of the building, he had to surrender to the laws of the real estate market. He persevered for a long time, and now faces a forced and fundamental change of his life. Not only his words, in which he talks about himself in the video, but also the things he has collected around him for years like flotsam, are part of this story. In the museum, they are artistically arranged and conserved, and they surround him again. According to Hoefner and Sachs, the material also tells a story of changing times. Today’s DIY stores only know the options “new and intact, or old and broken” (Hoefner) for decorating houses. The two artist’s securing of evidence, by contrast, in their knowledge of material and human losses, shows conditions that are poetic and alive.